49th St. Gallen Symposium "Capital for Purpose": 8–10 May 2019

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Communities

We bridge generations across 90 nations.

The St. Gallen Symposium connects three generations of leaders. Every community contributes with its own characteristics and the common understanding of fostering dialogue across generations for future impact on current challenges.

 

Leaders of Tomorrow

200 young minds who challenge the status quo.

Leaders of Tomorrow are 200 brilliant young minds - all under 30 - from every corner of the world. They attend the symposium to help shape the global intergenerational debate, thus becoming part of a global community that nurtures their friendships, ideas, and initiatives over the long run. The young generation’s representatives are carefully selected in two different ways: either by a global essay competition on the topic of the next symposium, or through a careful selection process conducted by the ISC-Team..

After the symposium, they join our Leaders of Tomorrow Alumni Community counting over 3000 members worldwide.

 

Aspiring Leaders

A bridge between three generations. Precisely chosen.

Aspiring Leaders represent the corporate world through potential future executive decision makers and the entrepreneurial environment through founders and executives, who focus on sustainable development of their companies. These two groups will bring a new, centred perspective to the debates in St. Gallen. They seek personal growth, enhancement of their personal network across generations and disciplines, and innovative ideas. Participation at the St. Gallen Symposium enables opportunities for access to a unique community for exchange and further development.

 

Leaders of Today

We are exclusive to top-level executives.

The Leaders of Today at the St. Gallen Symposium represent companies as well as political and academic institutions from all over the world. They belong to the upper echelon of today’s decision makers. Our team members embark on a global road show every year to meet with leading thinkers in business and academia and to invite them to the St. Gallen Symposium. If not for their unusual openness and their willingness to engage, the symposium would never have developed into a world-class platform for open and honest debates between generations.